Underlying Problem at AcuScan

(5) Based on the workload analysis two years ago, when we had more people BTW, every hour of every support engineer is promised to existing customers. Sure, the product is more mature and needs less support, but we also have 25% fewer programmers because of last year’s layoff. (6) Kelly has assumed that Pat is trying to get information from behind his back.

b: Pat: He has made the following assumptions: (1) There are certain factions within the company that do not see a path to the product launch and that the company should talk about alternatives, namely, contracting with an outside software design firm to manage the project and develop the software to bring the iScanner into a retail environment. (2) He has assumed that the prototype of the new product would have all the features and functions when it is offered for testing at a retail client. (3) He assumes that even with the budget cut to 400 k $ and the staff cut, it is possible to meet the August deadline. (4) Kelly assumes "why can’t we put together a prototype by August that includes all the features?" (5) He assumes that is ok if the product is not fully complete and the customer will be thrilled and we’ll be first to market. He wants iterations with V 1.0 first, and make it perfect next year with 1.1. (6) He assumes that the programmer has time as he has talked to one of the developers and the developers have said that since one of the installations is down, it is possible to build a new product. (7) Pat assumes that it is possible to get the product developed without using the help of Kelly. He wants to outsource the development to a vendor.&nbsp.

c: Cliff: He has made the following assumptions: (1) Reduction in the workforce will increase profitability. (2) To succeed in today’s tough economy, AcuScan needs to expand its technology into new markets, and again become the cutting–edge leader by creating a solution to an as–yet unrecognized customer need.

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