The European Defense Community

The European Defense Community is considered by many as the most ambitious project which was launched by the proponents of European unity. It was an attempt to form a European army, just barely five years after the end of World War II. Indeed, the creation of EDC was highly symbolic but it was “a fundamental part of national sovereignty that few countries were prepared to give up” (European Navigator).
The United States has designed a policy to get France committed to a supranational army in the European Defense Community in 1953. The French government was the one who initiated the EDC in the early 1950s based on the European Coal and Steel Community. It was designed to allow Germany to re-arm under a supra-national structure (Anderson).
The Korean War in 1950 awakened the fears of the western leaders and convinced them of the increasing threat of international communism. It was then that the United States started to encourage the Europeans—particularly, the FRG—to contribute to their own defence. In the case of Germany which experienced a loss in the most devastating of all wars, the formation of an army is unthinkable. This step was unthinkable for many of the Germans. The German rearmament was also considered abhorrence to its European neighbors, especially for France. “As the Korean War continued, however, opposition to rearmament lessened within the FRG, and Chinas entry in the war caused France to revise its negative position toward German rearmament” (The Library of Congress Country Studies).
The re-armament of Germany made France propose a European Defense Community under the aegis of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Konrad Hermann Josef Adenauer, the first chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany, quickly agreed to join the Community because he saw membership as likely to increase his country’s sovereignty. “The treaties establishing the EDC were signed in May 1952 in Bonn by the Western Allies and the FRG.&nbsp.

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