The Effects of Hair Dye on DNA

An increase in the risk of cancer for hair dye users has been widespread concern for researchers, battling the issue of whether chemical hair dye affects a person’s DNA. Researchers throughout the world have studied this issue, but the results have been inconclusive.&nbsp. The chemical ingredients contained in the hair dye are mutagenic in vitro, which are carcinogenic in animals and humans.

Yale Researcher, Tongzhang Zheng, assumed that hair dyes contribute to cancer links. He led a research team that analyzed hair dye uses in 601 women with non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and 717 similar women without cancer. According to the article, the results were the following: “An increased risk of non-Hodgkins lymphoma was observed for women who reported the use of hair coloring products before 1980. Women who used dark-colored permanent hair-coloring products for more than 25 years doubled their risk of non-Hodgkins lymphoma. The risk was nearly the same for women who used more than 200 applications of these products.” (DeNoon).

Yale researcher, Tongzhang Zheng, concluded his study by issuing the following statement: “No increased risk was seen in women who used semi-permanent dyes or temporary rinses.” Zheng was asked the following question in his interview with WebMD: “So should women stop using permanent hair dyes?” Zheng responded with the following statement: “Hair coloring is a personal decision for all kinds of reasons, but if I am the person, if semi-permanent or temporary dyes could serve my issue, I would do it. Because these contain much less of the ingredients linked to cancer.” (DeNoon).

The authors focused on determining if hair dye causes cancer in humans. The research study was performed by analyzing previous studies from random researchers. The database that the authors used in the report, “Personal Use of Hair Dyes and Risk of Cancer,” was a computerized MEDLINE search.&nbsp. &nbsp. &nbsp.

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