The deep empathy project

You are just three years old when you immigrated to the United States. How you are able to master English language and get proficiency in it so soon?Soon? It took nearly three decades for me to get some self-satisfaction about my writing skills. When parents are educated, children derive benefit of their knowledge. You know my father is a physician and he has an amazing power to pick up languages. He chooses the profession of a psychiatrist, which involves lots of talking, while interacting with the patients and counseling. His language skills helped me a lot, which he transmitted to me in style and with love.You were too eager to embrace your new country and in grade school, you changed your name to Chuck, Tom Seaver. In your novel also you have adopted the same procedure of changing names. Doc Hata’s name for example!Without the changed name he would not have survived. Without giving him a Japanese name do you think he would have survived in the novel? I mean amidst the hostile Japanese officers and soldiers?The ability of analysis does help. When there are a number of characters in a literary work, any author has first to analyze, when a character has to enter the story and when he has to exit. It is as good as buying a share and selling it and to build a portfolio of shares!Originally I intended so. But for building up other characters, Doc Hata had to grow big, he had to be there everywhere, influence the Japanese and Koreans, and the character gradually grew like the octopus. He was the meeting point for the war and cultural histories of Japan and Korea.For giving the true picture of the suffering of ‘comfort woman,’ I flew to South Korea to interview many women. Their suffering was much more than what I have depicted. They also told me that some men who visited them were kind to them. Doc Hata was ‘born’ out of those narrations and grew as the experiences thickened.I leave it

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