Old Life in Hangzhuo China and the Modern Life in New York City

30 May 2007 Old Life in Hangzhuo China and the Modern Life in New York They say that the only constant thing on this world is change. It is irrefutable that time has introduced a wide array of changes which brought about historical evolution and development. However, it is also notable that even though numerous changes have transformed places around the world, some remarkable details have not been lost but are somehow replicated. This paper will explore the similarities of the 13 century Hangzhuo City in China to the modern day New York City. It should be noted that even though these cities did not coexist in a same era, these cities share common features from the people’s lifestyle, geographical structure, economy, and physical structures.
Similar to the modern day New York City, Huangzhuo is one of the most important cities in China in the 13th century. Huangzhuo is the capital of the Southern Song dynasty making it a major cultural and political center. The account of Marco Polo describes this city as "magnificent" and "beyond dispute the finest and the noblest in the world" (Yule 185). Being surrounded by bodies of water, the city is surrounded by twelve thousand bridges in order to facilitate travel to and from it. This physical structure is also present in the modern day New York even though the number of bridges is far smaller. The Staten Island is connected to Brooklyn by the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge (New York City).
Being the capital of a dynasty, Huangzhuo has also been a seat of entertainment which is performed in what Marco Polo describes as "a rich, beautiful and spacious edifice, furnished in such style as to seem fit for a palace of an Emperor (Yule 186)" in one of the city’s island. Within this structure, important celebrations and occasions are held. In the modern day New York City, this can be likened to the Coney Island which is one of the earliest amusement ground in the US, the Madison Square Garden, and the Broadway theatre district (New York City).
The economic significance of the two cities is also comparable. Huangzhuo become very popular with merchants from different places because it is the primary seat of trading. Marco Polo lists ten principal markets within the city where buyers and sellers transact supplying all the needs of all the citizens. In New York, these markets also exist in all their forms and sizes from small convenience stores to large shopping malls and hypermarkets. It is irrefutable that the modern city boasts of having anything that a typical consumer need.
The lifestyle of the people in Huangzhuo shares pretty much the same lifestyle with the New Yorkers. They are all preoccupied in making their own crafts in order to support the large economy. The lifestyle is past-faced without much care about the passing of time. It should be noted that both cities work all day and all night in order to support the needs of each citizen.
Huangzhuo and New York City shares remarkable similarities amidst their distance both in time and space. These similarities however, exemplifies that man’s needs has never changed through time and are responded to by almost the same means.
Works Cited
"New York City." Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. 29 July 2007. 29 July 2007 Yule, Henry. "The Book of Ser Marco Polo the Venetian concerning the Kingdoms and Marvels of the East." London: John Murray. 1903

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