Martin Luther The Great Reformer by J A Morrison

Martin Luther: The great reformer This is a factual manuscript that is set in Eisleben, Germany. Morrison’s work, ‘Martin Luther, The Great Reformer’, is a life history of Martin Luther King and how he was brought up in a catholic residence, but always differed with the Catholic way of belief and opinion. Martin was brought up by very religious mom and dad. Hans and Margaret Luther. On November 10, 1843, they were blessed with a wonderful offspring, Luther . In his work, Morrison (pp.30) indicates that, immediately a day after his birth, his parents took him to the church for baptism. The work also indicates that Luther’s parents have always said and wanted to offer their child for baptism immediately after birth. Indeed, they did what they had promised to do. Not so long after his birth, they moved to Mansfield where his dad found an occupation at the mines. His both parents worked very hard in order to provide for their children. Morrison (pp.79) has a way of portraying Martin Luther’s description of his family that his father was a poor miner, his mother carried the wood from the forests on her back. and that both worked the flesh off their bones in order to bring up the siblings. His parents’ hard work is what gave him the ethics to be hard working when his turn had come to do the same. The book also indicates that Luther’s shift to Magdeburg where he asked for food as a homeless person. A year later Luther moved to Eisenach where he enrolled in school at St. George. While still studying there, a lady by the name, Ursula Cotta had the pitiful heart and he let him stay with her and her husband. After spending four years with the amazing couple, he moved to Erfurt where he was awarded the degree of Master of Arts. As Luther King was finding his heart’s place in heaven, Morrison (pp.71) indicates that the Catholic Church on the other hand advised him to be a monk. He took the advice and became a member of the congregation at Augustinian monastery in Erfurt. During his tenure as a monk, he realized that he was the only one concerned about cleansing his soul while the others used the positions to become gluttonous and sluggish. The book also indicated that he later became a priest in May 1507 and after about one and half years after becoming a priest, King was requested to teach moral philosophy at the University of Wittenberg and he accepted the request. Morrison (pp.87) continues to argue that while teaching at the University, Luther raised an issue that needed an urgent message to the Pope and he was chosen to be the sender. Morrison continues to argue that, for Luther, meeting the pope was like a dream come true. However, the trip did not go as expected. It during the trip when Luther realized what he felt towards the pope and Rome was wrong. He found out how corrupt how the Catholic Church leaders are. His opinion on the Catholic Church caused enmity between him and Pope Leo X. In his work, Morrison (pp.117) portrays the view that, in the long run, Luther termed the Catholic Church and the Pope as corrupt and spoke of his disapproval of the Pope. This sparked violence and the Pope was displeased. It reached to point where the Pope had to plan on how to end Luther’s life, but Luther did not heed to the threats and kept God on his side. For about a year he was housed at castle in Wartburg for his safety where he returned home in Wittenberg even when many people wanted him dead. He immediately started writing and preaching and enrolled 9 girls to join his nunnery. He had a good marriage with one of the girls, Catherine, and had a wonderful family of 6 children. Eventually, Luther passed away on February 18th, 1546 at the age of 62. He was mourned as great reformist and a gift from God. Morrison, in his work, ‘Martin Luther, The Great Reformer’ captured the grand life of Martin Luther King. Although he passed away, his teachings have a great impact on modern day life.Works cited Morrison, John. Martin Luther: The great reformer. New York: Christian liberty press, 2003. Print.

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