Influence of drugs on the musical output of a Beatles

Beneath the neat haircuts and proper suits, John, Paul, George, and Ringo were buzzed on speed from the very beginnings of their careers. They smoked pot with other musicians in England before they achieved stardom, and, in 1965, embraced LSD, becoming gurus of the acid movement. Even after they quit taking acid, their minds reacted to effects of the drug. Throughout the life of the band, drugs, particularly psychedelics, influenced the Beatles’ music.
At first, the musicians took over-the-counter uppers called Preludin to keep up the grueling schedule required of young musicians under contract in German clubs. John Lennon said, “If they came in at five in the morning and we’d been playing seven hours, they’d give us a crate of champagne and we were supposed to carry on. My voice began to hurt with the pain of singing. But we learned from the Germans that you could stay awake by eating slimming pills, so we did that” (The Beatles Anthology 49).

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