How to Improve China’s International Trade

International trade in China nowadays is the most developed form of international contacts. The Chinese international turnover during the years of reforms has grown from $10 billion in 1978 to $325 billion in 1997 (the positive balance equals to more than $40 billion). By the international trade volume China now takes the third place in the world, with its export and import in 2005 equaling to $1422.1 billion. (Lloyd 2006, p. 389) More than 220 countries have international trade relations with China, among which are USA, Japan, European Union, Korea, Taiwan, Russia, Australia and Canada. On July 1st, 2004 China adopted a new law ‘About International Trade’. With the aim of stimulating the international trade, this law has replaced the regime of considering and registering the right for carrying out external economic operations for the simple system of registration, and there have been created strict regulations, relating to import and export of goods and technologies, international service trade, international trade order, as well as the protection of copyright according to the abovementioned order. (Garnaut &amp. Song 2005, p. 27)
The dependence of Chinese economy on the international trade has grown significantly, which witnesses about its deep involvement into the world international ties and processes. Though China takes the third place in the world economy by the international trade volume, its weight in it can still become higher. The main obstacle for this is the low quality of the bigger portion of the goods, produced by the processing industry, which don’t survive the rivalry of the similar products on the world market, and the absence of possibilities for increasing the raw materials export. The main task of the Chinese export policy is the providing of import financing, which is built with the account of the international conjuncture. The main efforts are directed at stimulating predominant growth of finished goods’ export with the growing portion of science-heavy products. these processes are accompanied by achieving the quality of goods, which will correspond to the international quality standards. Considerable growth has been achieved in the total volume of finished goods’ export, which by the beginning of 90s constituted already 2/3 of the Chinese export.
The first place in export (50%) belongs to the consumer goods, among which clothes, shoes, toys, etc. An important place in the international trade of China is taken by the raw materials processing with the further export of the finished products – it constitutes about 50% of the total country’s turnover. China is the leader in exporting textiles and silk. Textile industry is the main source of foreign income for China. (Kent 2002, p. 344)
Less than 20% of export accounts for machine building and electro technical products. The growth of the specific gravity of these products in the world export is being restricted by the fact, that their quality is not competitive with that of other suppliers. The portion of Chinese machine building in the world export does not exceed 0.3%. (Manilla Bulletin 2005, p. 12)
The structure of the international trade in China was described here to decide, what challenges are set in front of Chinese economy and foreign trade as the essential part in its development. The definition and determination of challenges will lead us to the definition of

You Might Also Like