Hospice and Hospital Care for Children In The United Kingdom

In fact, in most instances pediatric physicians waste time trying futilely to save the life of the child even when they are cognizant that there is no hope of recovery.2
In England, hospice services are provided free to families and their children. Each service relies on charitable donations and fundraising efforts by the hospice service. Organizations and companies are also solicited to help in this worthwhile welfare program. England’s hospices have become so successful that the only rely on government assistance for five percent of their total funding. 3 (Rushton, Cynda Hylton, Pediatric Palliative Care: Coming of Age) This is opposed to the United States, in which, for example, the highly touted Ronald McDonald House program, asks each patient’s family to furnish 19 percent of the funding for their hospice stay.4 (Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia)
So what exactly does a hospice service do In England providers realize that when a child is given a diagnosis that offers no hope of recovery, the family oft…
So what exactly does a hospice service do In England providers realize that when a child is given a diagnosis that offers no hope of recovery, the family often feels isolated and alone. They also realize that some of the diseases which strike these children may take months or even years to run their full course. If the child is at home or in the hospital it becomes a relentless cycle of medical care and nursing around the clock. It is a place where energies, emotions and even love are exhausted.5 (Goldman, Anne 2001 pp183-193)
Conversely, pediatric hospices are based in the belief that life is for the living. The burden of care is taken from the child’s family and given to an entire care team so that the family may enjoy the little precious time they have left together. Hospices also offer a full range of pediatric palliative care which will depend on, not only the specific needs of the child, but for their parents and siblings as well.6 (Children’s Hospice International)
End-of-life hospices attempt to accommodate all of the needs of the dying patients and their family’s. Scholars have coined and defined the term "quality of dying" as dying in the place of one’s choice.6 (Tang et al. June, 2003) Despite a lack of empirical data, surveys conclude overwhelmingly that most people, including children, would not choose to die in the hospital because hospitals are not equipped with the holistic tools of a hospice to take care of them or to treat them in the best manner. Worse yet, as recently as the year 2000, the New England Journal of medicine reported that children suffering from illnesses that had little chance of recovery were, in the last months, also afflicted with terrible pain, and attempts by hospital pediatricians

You Might Also Like