Domestic Jurisdiction

The concept of domestic jurisdiction in relation to freedom from intervention is very basically shown in the unit of society we call family. Before we became citizens of a country, we became parts of a state or a city. Before we became parts of any city, we are first members of a community, and before we became members of a community, we are primarily members of our own families. This is where the dynamic process of protecting one owns freedom and autonomy begins. As a family, we want to function on our own to the best of our abilities with minor help from other people. This is our responsibility to our unit. We want to deal with problems and seek out solutions with each other’s help, before we ask assistance from other people. We try to keep family matters inside the home and away from the prying eyes of other families. We do not welcome intervention from other people in family matters without them being requested by us to do so. This action is not appreciated and even shunned as intrusion does not only violate privacy but it goes beyond the unwritten rule of familial boundaries where each family as a distinct unit of society has its own internal rules which the members abide to. These internal rules, however free the family members are in terms of acting on their own will, should be in accordance with the established general laws of the community. Intervention in family matters by other community members is justifiable if the laws of the community are not adhered to and if a certain member of the family is forced to act out of his own volition. This is also where law enforcement may intervene.
The same is true for communities. Communities have their own specific agenda and priorities. It is because of the distinct agenda that a community is very wary of intervention from other communities. Resources are limited in communities so intervention is most likely to occur as a means to help or assist. It may also be mutually beneficial to both parties concerned. Going to a higher level or a wider scope, cities or states have the same characteristics. They may belong to one government and one country, but cities or states have their own set of rules aside from the general laws of the land. They have differing strategies and techniques to promote growth within their reach. They want to handle their own problems and issues first before transferring them to a higher authority. They want to exercise their autonomy the best possible way they can, before submitting to the authority of the government. Of course, every action that they do should be within the general laws of the land. The moment that laws are broken and disregarded, intervention from government will always occur.
The principles discussed are all parts of the concept of domestic jurisdiction. They are the minor aspects and the foundation for the general idea of the term. In a larger setting, which is the global arena, the basic unit is the nation. A nation has its own members, its own rules, its own ways or techniques of doing things, its own resources and its own beliefs and values. All the factors comprising one nation may be slightly or very different from another. This degree of diversity makes each nation distinct from each

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