Critical review of Literature

These factors mean that interventions for alcohol dependency in children and young people have to vary slightly from standard interventions. As a public health topic, alcohol dependency in this age group is important as it can help to normalize certain behaviours (Lembke, 2011), which may further the problem. Alcohol itself is one of the biggest burdens on the NHS, as it can lead to problems with the cardiovascular and digestive systems (Lembke, 2011), as well as causing dementia and related psychiatric problems.
The purpose of this research is to explore which interventions for alcohol dependency in the 10-17 age bracket are most appropriate, and should inform policy guidelines on the matter. To do this, a critical review of the literature on the topic will be conducted. In this review, primary research on alcohol dependency in young people will be explored to show some of the most important issues that this age group has with alcohol dependency. This will highlight the important areas upon which to focus when considering interventions, and suggest areas that may be missing from current knowledge. Additionally, current policy guidelines in the UK will be analysed to ascertain whether they are appropriate when considered in light of the literature review.
Literature published before 2002 was excluded from the literature review as it was deemed to be irrelevant and potentially out of date, particularly the information on guidelines. Literature that was included was judged to be the most relevant amongst the search results at that time when informing the research objectives.
Alcohol dependency in children and young people is on the rise in the UK (NICE, 2011), and therefore has the potential to become a serious public health issue. Bonomo et al (2004) researched the relationship between alcohol dependency in those aged 14 to 15 and their

You Might Also Like