Canadian national identity

According to public opinion polls, Canadians are proud of their diversity since it reflects the admirable qualities of caring, accepting, and tolerance. Canadians have developed a fairly intense complex about their national identity. Most Canadians share universal conceptions. The Canadian media has identified that 85 percent of Canadians identified their nation with typical behaviors and a typical accent language (Diakiw, 2011).
There are numerous historical events that have shaped the current Canadian national identity. Some of the events include the participation of women in World War I, the creation of social welfare services and implementation of the third party system. Canadian political system has led to collective bargaining and equal rights for all workers (Diakiw, 2011). Immigration restrictions especially Asian immigrants and treatment of minority groups during the 20th century including residential schools, aboriginal issues and treaties led to emergency of shared values of tolerance and acceptance of diversity (Berdun &amp. Montserrat, 2007). The Official Languages Act and Canadian role in international peacekeeping led to emergency of a culture of tolerance and caring attitudes among the nationals (Berdun &amp. Montserrat, 2007).
Canadians are proud of the cultural image. Canadian government has facilitated the strengthening of national identity and heritage. A unified and tolerant Canadian national ideology inspires many Canadian nationals. Canadian government has promoted cultural diversity and heritage through limiting the effect of foreign influence such an American influence. The official symbols such as the Flag of Canada was modified in order to align it with Canadian culture. Prominent symbols such as the loon, Canada goose, beaver and Canadian horse are some of the symbols that Canadian national identity with in the society (MacKey, 1999). The government has also changed the

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