Analysis of Civil Aerospace Market

Air travel has ceased to become the hallmark of the rich and privileged and has reached out to the people, rich or otherwise. But along with this has come to a stronger streak of competitiveness, enhanced need for technical competence and embedded service orientations. The market has also become a breeding ground for myriad airline companies, small and big, who had decided to foray into a hitherto exclusive domain of and large established companies. With their small yet attractive packages and discounted offers to the flying clientele, they often beat the larger airliners fare wise, in their own backyards. Paradoxically, decontrol has brought, in its wake greater accountability, territory rights and market shareholdings. It has eased out the large and uncompetitive players and has forced the marginal ones to seek mergers and sellouts to stay in the race, for survival. However, the fact remains that the open skies policy, pursued by many large airlines, has been successful to a large extent and has made air travel safer, secure and convenient for all. Given the fact that private airliners are regularly adding to their destination networks, and remain committed to offering more destinations and increased number of flights at lower costs, and have instilled a healthy competitive spirit in the industry, it is believed that aerospace would definitely witness a sea change in the years to come. This is welcome, partly because the growth and development of global aerospace would benefit the fliers, the airline company, vendors and all agencies, directly or indirectly connected with this industry, and it would also add to the revenues of the state.
The Civil Aerospace market could be defined as market relating to the sale of airliners or parts/equipment/accessories to private carriers and organisations, leasing companies, private and public establishments, companies and individuals. Thus it could be said that “the global aerospace and defence market is deemed to be the revenues accrued by manufacturers from civil or military aerospace and defence equipment and parts or products.” (Aerospace &amp. Defence. 2007).
It could be a commodity business where the costs are fixed, at least in the short run.&nbsp.

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